Are there any better ways to explore the Turkish

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Are there any better ways to explore the Turkish coastline in the Mediterranean Sea than sailing on board a charter gullet for an 8 Day TurkYacht Sailing trip? Well we didn’t think so when we first booked our trip and hopefully our review will help you choose your next adventure too. Booking through TurkYacht proved to be really easy and they were wonderful to deal with. We especially like that you can go on the Turkyacht website and see where you can sail and which gullets are avaliable. Log into their website and take a look. www.turkyacht.com. Although we stayed in Fethiye, TurkYacht have stations dotted all along the Turkish coast, including Bodrum, Marmaris and Bozburun.

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Aphrodisias – Turkey – Destinations

aphrodisias

The ancient city of Aphrodisias, dedicated to the goddess of love Aphrodite, was a Hellenistic city which also flourished under Roman and Byzantine rule. Excavations in the 24-meter-high (78 ft) theater hill have revealed layers of settlement going back to the Bronze Age (c. 2800-2200 BC). It was founded in the 5th c. BC and flourished under the Roman Empire (1st c. BC-4th c. AD). Mark Antony recognized the autonomy of Aphrodisias in the 1st c. BC. In the Byzantine period it was first the seat of an archbishopric, then of the metropolitan of Caria. In the 6th c. AD the name of Aphrodisias was changed to Stavropolis, the city of the Cross, to erase the pagan goddess of love from peopleís minds. As the capital of Caria Aphrodisias was finally called Caria which then became Geyre in Turkish. Later in the 13th century it was abandoned. The city was buried by a series of earthquakes.

Aphrodisias was primarily known as a center for the arts, specifically sculpture. The Aphrodisias School of Sculpture had a distinctive style and was very well circulated throughout the Greek and Roman world. Statues with corresponding signatures were discovered from Spain to present day Germany and virtually everywhere in the Roman world. The existence of Aphrodisias was almost forgotten until a Turkish professor, Dr. Kenan Erim, of New York University received a grant from National Geographic to excavate the site in the 1960ís. His archaeological work revealed a city of vast importance.

We just returned from what can only be described as the most relaxing

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We just returned from what can only be described as the most relaxing 8 days of our lives on the first ever TurkYacht charter gullet sailing holiday. Not only was it our first TurkYacht cruise but it was also our first travel adventure to Turkey and Greece as well. And what better way to relax than on a traditional Turkish sailing gullet, otherwise known as Karizma!For 8 days and 7 nights we cruised the beautiful and refreshing crystal clear waters in the Mediterranean Sea off the southern shores of Turkey and Greek islands with 14 other lucky passengers.

Some of TurkYacht’s sailing routes include bases of Marmaris, Gocek, and Fethiye. Unlike many island-based sailing in the Mediterranean, a holiday in this southern area of the Aegean primarily involves cruising the many bays, gulfs and inlets of mainland Turkey. Surrounding the coast are massive mountain ranges dropping sheer into azure seas, carving the shore into a procession of tiny coves, hidden bays, and pristine beaches. Hillsides forming a vista from your yacht are covered in pine and olives trees and the ruins of countless ancient cities; Greek, Roman, and Byzantine cram the coast, limiting development to a few isolated areas. The incredible combination of historical sites and wonders, beautiful sailing and superb swimming that make this coastline a truly fantastic destination.Turkey isn’t short of a nightspot either with the resorts of Marmaris, Fethiye and Gocek all standing out with their array of bars and nightclubs. Come here to drink, dance and be merry!

From Turkey we sailed west towards the islands of Rhodes, Kos, Kalimnos and Leros. Rhodes still has much to offer sailors with its splendid medieval capital city, also named Rhodes, and several smaller coastal villages that retain their authentic appeal . Kos is the starting port for sailing in the Northern Dodecanese. A touristy island, Kos highlights the benefits of a sailing holiday, where you can visit the bars, restaurants and churches and mosques of Kos town and then set out for the less populated islands of Kalymnos, Leros and Patmos. By day, if we were not sunning ourselves on the deck of the boats then we would be exploring the cultural offerings that Greece has in abundance. Whether it was the ruins of the towns or the old Castles and forts overlooking the small villages.

Luckily the evenings were just as good, if not better. Hours were spent sitting onboard the gullet with a beer or a wine in hand watching as the sky changed from royal blue into amazing reds, oranges and yellows as the sun set on each glorious day. Unfortunately like all good things it had to come to an end, and we finished our holiday back on mainland Turkey.

HISTORY OF BODRUM

blue cruises turkeyThe first recorded settlers in Bodrum region were the Carians and the harbor area was colonized by Dorian Greeks as of the 7th century BC. The city later fell under Persian rule. Under the Persians, it was the capital city of the satrapy of Caria, the region that had since long constituted its hinterland and of which it was the principal port. Its strategic location ensured that the city enjoyed considerable autonomy. Archaeological evidence from the period such as the recently discovered Salmakis (Kaplankalesi) Inscription, now in Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology, attest to the particular pride[clarification needed] its inhabitants had developed.[4] A famous native was Herodotus, the Greek historian (484-420 BC). Surviving substructures and ruins of the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, in Halicarnassus (modern Bodrum.) Mausolus ruled Caria from here, nominally on behalf of the Persians and independent in practical terms for much of his reign between 377 to 353 BC. When he died in 353 BC, Artemisia II of Caria, who was both his sister and his widow, employed the ancient Greek architects Satyros and Pythis, and the four sculptors Bryaxis, Scopas, Leochares and Timotheus to build a monument, as well as a tomb, for him. The word “mausoleum” derives from the structure of this tomb. It was a temple-like structure decorated with reliefs and statuary on a massive base. It stood for 1700 years and was finally destroyed by earthquakes. Today only the foundations and a few pieces of sculpture remain.

http://www.turkyacht.com/